Assessment item 1 - Reflections back to top Value: 20% Due Date: 18-Mar-2022 Return Date: 08-Apr-2022 Length: 800 words Group Assessment: No Submission method options: Alternative submission method...

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Assessment item 1 - Reflections

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Value:20%Due Date:18-Mar-2022Return Date:08-Apr-2022Length:800 wordsGroup Assessment:NoSubmission method options:Alternative submission method
TASK
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You are to write an 800 word reflection in two parts. This reflection will establish your baseline knowledge as you progress through the subject.

Part A (500 words):


You can complete this after doing the learning activities from Topic 1 & 2


Using your required reading from Module 1, Topic 1 'Reflecting on a Way of Being: Anchor Principles of Cultural Competence' (Russell, 2020), reflect on your own positioning using the following prompts:

  • What do you know / not know about Indigenous Australian peoples and communities?
  • Where and/or from whom did that knowledge come?
  • What do you know / not know about Australian culture and history?
  • Can you identify any limitations to what you know?
  • Drawing on your reflection on the previous questions, consider which ‘anchor principles’ (Social Justice, Knowing Self, Re-storying, Action) you most identify with. How do these principles relate to your understanding of your own positioning?

Part B (300 words):

You can complete this during Topic 3

Locate a media article which relates to Indigenous peoples, knowledges or cultures and which aligns with your current interests or understandings– provide a linkto the article as your heading (some articles will be provided in the subject site as examples).No other sources are required for Part B.

The media is an example of a powerful institution which shapes our knowledge. Incorporate these prompt questions into a synthesised reflection:

  • Thinking about your knowledge of Australian history, does the author provide all the information required to understand the issue being discussed? What information is missing?
  • Is there a presumption that readers already hold views about Indigenous peoples? What are the taken-for-granted assumptions?
  • What would a reader infer about the relationship between Indigenous peoples and non-Indigenous peoples based on the text of the article? How are Indigenous and non-Indigenous people positioned in the article? (e.g., is there a social or cultural norm evident? Are Indigenous peoples constructed as different to or divergent from the norm?)
  • Is there an Indigenous viewpoint included in the article? If yes, how does the author use Indigenous perspectives to support or contradict the main message? If no, how could this influence a readers' perception of Indigenous people and of the main message in the article?

Russell G. (2020). Reflecting on a Way of Being: Anchor Principles of Cultural Competence. In J. Frawley, G. Russell & J. Sherwood (Eds.),Cultural Competence and the Higher Education Sector(pp. 31-42). Singapore: Springer.

This assessment will be completed by using the secure online assessment platform, Cadmus. Cadmus can be accessed through the subject Interact2 site. In Cadmus, you will find further assessment instructions, write your submission, and submit your assessment. The platform is designed to simplify the assessment process, making it easy to focus on the task at hand while developing your academic skills. You can find out more about Cadmus here:https://cadmus.io/getting-started/students/intro-to-the-student-environment

See your Assessment 1 tab in the subject site for more information.

RATIONALE
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This assessment task will work towards assessing the following learning outcome/s:

  • be able to investigate, compare and reflect on standpoint to explain Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples' historical positioning.
  • be able to describe, analyse and theorise individual and collective standpoint in relation to Indigenous peoples' experiences of Australian history.
MARKING CRITERIA AND STANDARDS
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Assessable component

HD
17 – 20 / 20

D
15 – 16 / 20

C
13 – 14 / 20

P
10 – 12 / 20

F
0 – 9 / 20

Works towards meeting the learning outcome:

Be able to investigate, compare and reflect on standpoint to explain Indigenous and non - Indigenous peoples’ historical positioning.

9 marks

Evaluates and examines understandings about Australian culture and history, and Indigenous people and communities. Further compares and reflects on how this knowledge was acquired. Investigates the limitations of the knowledge. The entry is clearly supported by the recommended scholarly source. Uses at least one anchor point from the required reading to frame the reflection and demonstrates a sophisticated understanding of the reading.

Explanation considers significant influences on understandings about Australian people, communities, cultures, and history. Entry evaluates how this knowledge was acquired and the limitations of the knowledge. Links anchor point to this evaluation.

Explanation summarises what the writer knows or does not know about Australian and Indigenous Australian people, communities, cultures, and history. Describes where and from whom that knowledge comes. Provides relevant, specific examples to develop points to identify at least one anchor point and explains why they identify with it and how it relates to their own positioning.

Entry outlines what is known or not known about Australian and Indigenous Australian people, communities, cultures, and history. Outlines where and from whom that knowledge comes. Identifies limitations to that knowledge. Identifies an anchor point from the required reading and starts to explain why they identify with it and how it relates to their own positioning.

Does not make reference to required source. Entry does not explain what is known or not known about Australian and Indigenous Australian people, communities, cultures, and history. Entry does not outline where and from whom that knowledge comes. Entry does not identify limitations to that knowledge. Does not identify an 'anchor point' from the subject reading and start or does not explain why they identify with it.

Identifies and provides a comparative analysis of the positioning of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians in the article.














4 marks


Provides evidence of covert meanings in the article to support synthesised analysis of the article.


Analyses how the ordering and presentation of information constructs and positions Indigenous and non-Indigenous readers, including reflections on own pre-existing knowledge and how that informs analysis.

Identifies and examines the overt and covert assumptions about Indigenous Australians in the article which includes a discussion of how these assumptions may align with commonly expressed views about Indigenous Australians in the media.


Discusses how these assumptions construct relationships between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and the positioning of Indigenous and non-Indigenous people.

Identifies the potential implications of Indigenous viewpoints on readers’ perceptions.


Provides evidence from the article to support analysis, including covert meanings. Makes comparisons across the article.


Link to pre-existing knowledge and how that informs analysis.


Identifies and examines the overt and covert assumptions about Indigenous Australians in the article.

Analyses how these assumptions may align with commonly expressed views about Indigenous Australians in the media to reinforce ideas about the relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and the positioning of Indigenous and non-Indigenous people.


Identifies the overtandcovert assumptions about Indigenous Australians in the article and includes a discussion of how these assumptions may align with commonly expressed views about Indigenous Australians in the media.

Describes how this could reinforce ideas about the relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians and the positioning of Indigenous and non-Indigenous people.


Identifies some assumptions about Indigenous Australians in the article. Identifies how Indigenous people arepositionedin the article.


Explains how these assumptions are similar to views about Indigenous Australians in the media to imply a particular relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.




Does not identify assumptions about Indigenous Australians in the article.


Does not describe how those assumptions are used [in the media] to imply a particular relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.


Identifies the impact of the absence or presence of Indigenous Australian viewpoints in reinforcing readers’ perceptions. Examines taken-for-granted assumptions about Australian history or culture.





4 marks

Examines and analyses the absence and / or presence of Indigenous viewpoints in the article in relation to overt and covert assumptions about Australian culture and history. Analyses how these assumptions construct taken-for-granted assumptions about Australian history.


Provides an integrated analysis that discusses the potential implications of Indigenous viewpoints on readers’ perceptions of Australianculture and history.


The absence and / or presence of Indigenous viewpoints in the article is analysed in relation to overt and covert assumptions about Australian culture and history. Analyses how these assumptions reinforce taken-for-granted assumptions about Australian history and culture and identifies the potential implications of these assumptions on Indigenous viewpoints on readers’ perceptions of the issues discussed in the article.


The absence and / or presence of Indigenous viewpoints in the article is linked to the discussion of overt and covert assumptions and how this could reinforce reader's perceptions.


The absence and / or presence of Indigenous viewpoints in the article is linked to the discussion of overt and covert assumptions about Australian culture and history. Describes how these assumptions reinforce taken-for-granted assumptions about Australian history and culture.


Identifies the absence or presence of Indigenous viewpoints in the article.
Explains how the included or excluded information relates to taken-for-granted assumptions about Australian history or culture.


Identifies what information is included or excluded about Australian history or culture.



Does not identify Indigenous viewpoints in the article.


Does not relate the included or excluded information to taken-for-granted assumptions about Australian history or culture.

Does not identify what information is included or excluded about Australian history or culture.


Fulfillstechnical aspects of the task.







3 marks


Written expression shows clear organisation. Reflections are structured clearly and cohesively in a synthesised response. Referencing requirements in Part A are met.

Written expression shows clear organisation. Reflections are structured clearly in a synthesised response. Uses the APA (7th ed.) with few errors. Referencing requirements are met in Part A.

There are few errors relating to writing and references and terminology. Uses APA (7th ed.) system with few errors. There are few imprecise statements or generalisations, and content is organised in a synthesised response. Referencing requirements are met in Part A.

Within required word count. Attempts to use the APA (7th ed.) referencing system. Uses formal written expression consistently with few errors in a synthesised response. Developing skills in using appropriate terminology. Quotes from the media article are 10 words or fewer. The link to the media article is included as a heading to Part B.Referencing requirements are met in Part A.

Not within required word count. Does not use APA (7th ed.) system. Uses informal written expression or there are many errors which impede comprehension. Content is not synthesised. No evidence of consideration of appropriate terminology. More than 10 words are quotes from the media article. Does not include the link to the media article as a heading to Part B. Does not meet referencing requirements in Part A.


PRESENTATION
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  • Proof read your work closely for written expression so that your ideas emerge clearly and concisely.
  • You can go 10% over or under the word count without penalty.
  • An introduction and conclusion is not needed for this task.
  • You can use first person in assessments. Ensure you are using first person for evidence based statements, e.g. 'I know X because of Y', 'My understanding of X is derived from Y'. Do not use first person for opinion, 'I feel ...' 'In my opinion'. This task is a critical reflection on your standpoint and knowledge sources.
  • Use APA (7th) style referencing.
  • Access terminology resources in the subject site to ensure that you are using the most appropriate terminology.
  • Do not use any other sources in Part B - use the article you choose.
  • As your markers will have access to the article you choose through the link you provide, do not quote the article unless you are unable to express your point without doing so. If you do need to cite a part of the original article, keep the quote to 10 words or less.
Answered 1 days AfterMar 15, 2022

Answer To: Assessment item 1 - Reflections back to top Value: 20% Due Date: 18-Mar-2022 Return Date:...

Rudrakshi answered on Mar 17 2022
49 Votes
Running Head: HUMANITIES                                1
HUMANITIES                                         2
HUMANITIES
Table of Contents
Part A    3
Part B    4
References    6
Part A
1     As per my knowledge aboriginal and To
es Strait Islanders are i
ndigenous peoples of Australia who have lived there for thousands of years. They are not a group, but rather a collection of thousands of communities, each with its own dialect, background, and cultural practices, which come together to form a single entity (Wright et al., 2019). The health and well-being of Aboriginal people who live in big cities differs from that of Aboriginal people who live in the To
es Strait region.
"People who live in the To
es Strait are distinct from those who live in those areas or in rural parts of Alice Springs." Indigenous peoples and indigenous peoples are so named because they were the first people to reside on their te
itory before immigrants a
ived from other lands. They are, by definition, a diverse group of individuals representing a cultural diversity and races. Those who descended from people who were already living in a nation or environmental condition before immigrants came, but who were subsequently controlled by migrants via conquering, colonization, resettlement, or other ways.
2     From what I understand, Australians are open-minded and well-known for being open-minded. Australians think that anyone has the right to a fair opportunity at life. In the case of provision of health services, this is expressed in publically sponsored ubiquitous assistance. As stated by Jaakkola, Juntunen & Näkkäläjärvi (2018), Australia is not as physically hierarchical as Britain, and it is very cosmopolitan, since it is home to the majority of the world's faiths. It is unfair to measure Australian culture to any other culture since it is a one-of-a-kind combination of many different elements.
In its most basic form, Australian culture is a Western civilization that was initially drawn from Britain, but it has also been impacted by...
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