CASE STUDY The Inner East Artisans Cooperative The Inner-East Artisans Cooperative was formed in the early 1990s, when a small group of talented artists (including painters, potters, jewellers, and...

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CASE STUDY




The Inner East Artisans Cooperative


The

Inner-East Artisans Cooperative
was formed in the early 1990s, when a small group of talented artists (including painters, potters, jewellers, and wide variety of other arts and crafts), began to sell their creative products at regular Sunday morning market stalls in Melbourne’s inner eastern suburbs. Over the years, the group has expanded considerably and now has approximately 65 members. In additions to selling their creative products at stalls, the cooperative also now has its own website. The website hosts information about the individual artists who are members of the Cooperative; details of upcoming events, such as exhibitions and presentations; and an online catalogue and ordering system, through which the public can order items online.


The Cooperative is a not-for-profit organisation, whose operations are performed mainly by volunteers. Members pay the Cooperative an annual membership fee of $350, plus a 20% commission on all sales that they make through the Cooperative (online sales, and sales at market stalls). These funds are used to pay for the website services, market stall overheads, event costs, and accounting services. Any leftover funds are contributed to the cost of running the Cooperative’s annual Christmas party, which takes place after the Cooperative holds its annual general meeting (AGM) in early December. Up until now, the current fees and commissions have been enough to support the activities of the Cooperative, but increased costs may require the Cooperative to increase these.


At their AGM, the Cooperative appoints a small group of members (typically three or four) to its Management Committee. The members of this committee are commonly referred to as the ‘managers’, and have the responsibility of managing the operations of the Cooperative for the next twelve months. Their role involves managing contributor memberships, and market stalls and other events. They deal directly with the website service provider, the accountant and financial services, market stall organisers, and event venue owners. Other members of the Cooperative (i.e., ‘non-managers’), with the help of family and friends, perform duties which include the setting up and packing down of stalls; taking cash and credit card payment at stalls; manually updating their online inventory after market stalls; and arranging the delivery for online orders that they have received.


Each member of the Cooperative has an account on the Cooperative’s website. These accounts are set up by the managers. When a new member joins, managers lodge a request with the web service provider for a new account to be set up. Once their account has been set up, members can access their accounts to perform a variety of tasks, which include maintaining their profile (where they can include a brief description of themselves, including awards and other acknowledgements that they have received); adding or removing products from the online catalogue and inventory system; and responding to online orders or queries. The online system notifies members via email when an order or query is received for one of that member’s products. If a member is unavailable, managers utilise their accounts to fulfil online orders and manually update the online inventory following market stall sales.


The website allows potential customers to view products in a number of ways. They can view products produced by individual artists. They can also view products by category (e.g., paintings, jewellery, pottery, clothing, etc.). The online store utilises the typical shopping cart and checkout model, and has facilities for payment via credit card or PayPal. When an online purchase is confirmed and payment details are validated, the inventory system is automatically updated and email notifications are sent to the appropriate artists and managers.


Sales reports are generated on a weekly basis by the online sales service. These reports are emailed to managers, who combine this information with market stall sales figures. The funds, less commission, are then distributed to artists for the products sold. Every quarter (i.e., every 3 months), these sales records, together with bank statements, are sent to the accountant, who handles the Cooperative’s financial affairs with the tax Australian Taxation Office (ATO). The managers also present monthly sales reports to the members.


The Cooperative is continuing to expand. Whereas the group initially consisted of a small group of people located in a relatively small area of Melbourne, an increasing numbers of members from outer lying areas are also joining. In fact, numbers have increased so significantly that the Cooperative is even considering changing its name from the Inner-East Artisan’s Cooperative to the ‘Melbourne Artists Group’. However the Cooperative’s main concern at the moment is to improve their information system. Consequently, they are seeking to employ the services of a systems analyst.







Tasks [120 marks total]



You need to analyse (as a preliminary to designing) an information system for the Artisans Cooperative using the Object Oriented methodology. Your tasks encompass the following steps:







I.

Requirements Gathering [15 marks]






1.
Create an

owner’s view

for the system that you can show to stakeholders for feedback.

You can make any reasonable assumptions if any details that you think are important are not clearly mentioned in the case description.



[10 marks]





2.
Identify the users of the system. List these under subheadings for business and information systems users.



[5 marks]












II.

Domain Analysis [20 marks]




3. Write
domain definitions
and, from there, proceed to establish the
domain scope
for the system and each subsystem. The following table provides a template for your answer.


























Artisans Cooperative



Domain Scope



Domain



Scope Outline





§





§







[10 marks]









4.
Identify the

domain concepts

from the domain definition and scopes. Categorise the concepts into processes, functions, roles, objects, and business rules. You need to list them in a

domain dictionary

table using the following template:





























Artisans Cooperative



Domain Dictionary



Name



Type



Description



















[10 marks]






III.

Behavioural Modelling [45 marks]





After completing the domain analysis, you are ready to start
use case modelling. Please make sure that you use the domain concepts identified during the domain analysis activity as the basis for behavioural modelling.





5.
Identify

stakeholders

of the whole system. List them with descriptions using the following table template.


























Artisans Cooperative



Stakeholders & Actors



Name



Description














[5 marks]





6.
Create a Use Case Summary for both the
Online Ordering
and
Inventory Management
subsystems of the
Artisans Cooperative.
































Artisans Cooperative



Online Ordering: Use Case Summary



ID



Name



Description



Actors

















































Artisans Cooperative



Inventory Management: Use Case Summary



ID



Name



Description



Actors























[15 marks]










7.
Complete a use case template for a use case that relates to the online inventory being manually updated after a market stall. Use the blank template below.
































































































Use Case:





ID:





Scope:





Priority:





Summary:





Primary Actor:





Supporting Actors:





Stakeholders:





Generalization:





Include:





Extend:





Precondition:





Trigger:





Normal Flow:





Sub-Flows:





Alternate Flow/ Exceptions:





Post-Condition:





Non-Behavioral Requirements:





Open Issues:





Source:





Author:





Revision & Date








[5 marks]





8.
Create a

use case diagram

for the
Inventory Management
subsystem, complete with “include and “extend”, where appropriate.





[10 marks]





9.
Create an

activity diagram

for the
Online Ordering
subsystem.






[10 marks]














IV.

Structural and Dynamic Modelling

[40 marks]





After completing the behavioural modelling, you will continue with structural and dynamic modelling.





10.
Identify classes for both the
Online Ordering
and
Inventory Management
subsystems. List each class, along with responsibilities and the use cases they are associated with, using the following table templates.































Artisans Cooperative



Online Ordering: Preliminary Class Candidates



Class



Responsibilities



Use Cases





§



§





§



§






























Artisans Cooperative



Inventory Management: Preliminary Class Candidates



Class



Responsibilities



Use Cases





§



§





§



§






[15 marks]





11.
Create a complete

class diagram

with associations and multiplicity information for the
Online Ordering
subsystem. Is there any relationship in this case study that can be described by aggregation/composition? Are there classes that can be generalized/specialized?



[15 marks]






12.
Create a

sequence diagram

for the process of a customer selecting products and completing an online order on the
Artisans Cooperative
website.



[10 marks]


Answered Same DayOct 03, 2019

Answer To: CASE STUDY The Inner East Artisans Cooperative The Inner-East Artisans Cooperative was formed in the...

David answered on Nov 26 2019
107 Votes
CASE STUDY
The Inner East Artisans Cooperative
The Inner-East Artisans Cooperative was formed in the early 1990s, when a small group of talented artists (including painters, potters, jewellers, and wide variety of other arts and crafts), began to sell their creative products at regular Sunday mornin
g market stalls in Melbourne’s inner eastern subu
s. Over the years, the group has expanded considerably and now has approximately 65 members. In additions to selling their creative products at stalls, the cooperative also now has its own website. The website hosts information about the individual artists who are members of the Cooperative; details of upcoming events, such as exhibitions and presentations; and an online catalogue and ordering system, through which the public can order items online.
The Cooperative is a not-for-profit organisation, whose operations are performed mainly by volunteers. Members pay the Cooperative an annual membership fee of $350, plus a 20% commission on all sales that they make through the Cooperative (online sales, and sales at market stalls). These funds are used to pay for the website services, market stall overheads, event costs, and accounting services. Any leftover funds are contributed to the cost of running the Cooperative’s annual Christmas party, which takes place after the Cooperative holds its annual general meeting (AGM) in early December. Up until now, the cu
ent fees and commissions have been enough to support the activities of the Cooperative, but increased costs may require the Cooperative to increase these.
At their AGM, the Cooperative appoints a small group of members (typically three or four) to its Management Committee. The members of this committee are commonly refe
ed to as the ‘managers’, and have the responsibility of managing the operations of the Cooperative for the next twelve months. Their role involves managing contributor memberships, and market stalls and other events. They deal directly with the website service provider, the accountant and financial services, market stall organisers, and event venue owners. Other members of the Cooperative (i.e., ‘non-managers’), with the help of family and friends, perform duties which include the setting up and packing down of stalls; taking cash and credit card payment at stalls; manually updating their online inventory after market stalls; and a
anging the delivery for online orders that they have received.
Each member of the Cooperative has an account on the Cooperative’s website. These accounts are set up by the managers. When a new member joins, managers lodge a request with the web service provider for a new account to be set up. Once their account has been set up, members can access their accounts to perform a variety of tasks, which include maintaining their profile (where they can include a
ief description of themselves, including awards and other acknowledgements that they have received); adding or removing products from the online catalogue and inventory...
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