Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health October 2018 Updated January 2019 Centers for Disease Control...

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Public Health
Emergency
Preparedness
and Response
Capabilities
National Standards for
State, Local, Tribal, and
Territorial Public Health
October 2018
Updated January 2019
Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention
Center for Preparedness
and Response
1
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Introduction
Public health systems play an integral role in preparing communities to respond to and
recover from threats and emergencies. The public
health consequences of disasters and emergencies
initially affect local jurisdictions. During the initial
response, the people and communities that are
impacted must rely on local community resources.
As a result, all state, local, tribal, and territorial
emergency response stakeholders must be
prepared to coordinate, cooperate, and collaborate
with cross-sector partners and organizations at
all governmental levels when emergencies occur,
regardless of the type, scale, or severity.
While public health agencies are expected to
take the lead when infectious disease outbreaks
occur, jurisdictional public health agencies also
must be prepared to coordinate with a diverse
array of partners and stakeholders, including other
government agencies to refine public health lead
and support roles, responsibilities, and assignments
when other technological, human-caused, or
natural disasters occur.
In 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention (CDC) established the Public Health
Preparedness Capabilities: National Standards
for State and Local Planning, a set of 15 distinct,
yet interrelated, capability standards designed
to advance the emergency preparedness and
response capacity of state and local public
health systems. These standards pioneered a
national capability-based framework that helped
jurisdictional public health agencies structure
emergency preparedness planning and further
formalize their public health agency Emergency
Support Function (ESF) #8 role(s) in partnership
with emergency management agencies.
Each capability standard identifies priority resource
elements that are relevant to both routine public
health activities and essential public health
services. This helps support an “everyday use”
model in which applying the capability standards
to improve day-to-day effectiveness builds a
stronger foundation from which a jurisdictional
public health agency can surge when an
emergency incident occurs. Although jurisdictional
public health agencies can demonstrate capability
through exercises, planned events, and real
incident responses, they also are encouraged to
incorporate routine public health agency activities
strategically into demonstration projects to test
and evaluate their emergency preparedness and
response capacity.
2
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Introduction
Public Health Emergency Preparedness Cooperative Agreement Program
In 1999, CDC competitively awarded approximately $40 million to 50 states and four major metropolitan
health departments to support bioterrorism preparedness and response. The program, now administered
by CDC’s Center for Preparedness and Response, Division of State and Local Readiness (DSLR), evolved into
the current Public Health Emergency Preparedness (PHEP) cooperative agreement.
Today, the PHEP program funds 62 cooperative agreement recipients: 50 states, four localities, and eight
territories and freely associated states. Depending upon the organizational structure of the funded
jurisdictional public health agency, directly funded PHEP recipients may share PHEP funding with local
public health agencies, tribes, and native-serving organizations. This approach provides financial resources
to help build public health emergency response capability both nationally and at state, local, tribal, and
territorial government levels.
Since the initial publication of the preparedness capability standards in 2011, CDC has required that the
62 PHEP recipients develop and implement capability-based work plans and use their PHEP funding to
build and sustain their public health preparedness and response capacity. However, use of the capability
standards now extends well beyond informing jurisdictional public health agency cooperative agreement
work plans. Today, the capability standards are a vital framework for jurisdictional public health agencies
to organize and evaluate emergency responses and exercises, ensure the public health consequences of
jurisdictional emergencies are a response priority, and promote collaboration by establishing a common
language among preparedness professionals. Perhaps most importantly, the capability standards allow
state, local, tribal, and territorial public health agencies to advance response strategies aligned with
community needs, preferences, and resources without dictating or overprescribing “how” to specifically
manage every jurisdictional response.
Operational Support for the National Preparedness System and the National
Preparedness Goal
CDC’s capability standards and PHEP cooperative agreement program provide operational support for the
Federal Emergency Management’s (FEMA) National Preparedness System to strengthen the security and
resilience of the United States through systematic preparation for threats that pose the greatest risk to the
nation’s security. The National Preparedness System has six parts that include identifying and assessing risk,
estimating capability requirements, building and sustaining capabilities, planning to deliver capabilities,
validating capabilities, and reviewing and updating.
The National Preparedness System outlines an organized process for everyone in the whole community to
advance their preparedness activities and achieve the National Preparedness Goal
“A secure and resilient nation with the capabilities
required across the whole community to prevent, protect
against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from the threats
and hazards that pose the greatest risk .” (FEMA, 2015)
3
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Introduction
The National Preparedness Goal describes a vision for preparedness nationwide and identifies 32 core
capabilities necessary to achieve that vision across five mission areas: Prevention, Protection, Mitigation,
Response, and Recovery. Although only one of the 32 core capabilities within the National Preparedness
Goal specifically focuses on public health and medical support (Public Health, Healthcare, and Emergency
Medical Services), many of the core capabilities relate to and contain public health and medical
considerations that are necessary to successfully achieve a secure and resilient nation.
CDC’s 2018 Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities: National Standards for
State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health include operational considerations that support the public
health and medical components of the 32 core capabilities specified in the National Preparedness Goal.
Jurisdictions should use these operational considerations to develop their public health agency response
strategies in greater alignment with the jurisdictional public health agency ESF #8 role.
Capability Update Initiative
Since the publication of the capability standards in 2011, public health emergency preparedness and
response capacity has continued to be tested at national, state, local, tribal, and territorial levels. Ongoing
risks related to chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive incidents as well as cyberattacks
further underscore the importance of updating and modernizing jurisdictional all-hazards public health
preparedness and response strategies to address emerging technologies and new 21st century threats
through a continuous cycle of planning, organizing, training, equipping, exercising, evaluating, and taking
corrective action (in accordance with FEMA’s National Preparedness System).
The PHEP program underwent an internal review in 2015 to identify opportunities to strengthen program
tools, resources, and guidance. The review identified the need for CDC to implement several public health
emergency preparedness improvement initiatives, including the Capabilities Update Initiative, the formal
process CDC used for revising the Public Health Preparedness Capabilities: National Standards for State
and Local Planning.
The purpose of the Capability Update Initiative was to update, clarify, and streamline capability content
and enact changes that would best support state, local, tribal, and territorial public health emergency
preparedness work without drastically altering the established 15-capability structure. Thus, the update
process applied a similar approach to that used for the initial development of the 2011 capability
standards. The process included individual work groups for each of the 15 capabilities along with four
additional cross-cutting work groups to address at-risk individuals with access and functional needs, tribal
populations, environmental health, and pandemic influenza.
Lessons learned from public health emergency responses, updates to public health preparedness science,
revised guidance and resources, findings from internal reviews and assessments, subject matter expert
feedback from the practice community, and input from allied agencies all contributed to capability
updates. In addition, representatives from professional associations, including the Association of Public
Health Laboratories (APHL), the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO), the Council of
State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE), the National Association of County and City Health Officials
(NACCHO), and the National Emergency Management Association (NEMA) were instrumental in helping to
shape the updated capability content.
4
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Introduction
Summary of Capability Updates
The 2018 Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities: National Standards for State,
Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health recognizes the maturity and experience jurisdictional public
health emergency preparedness and response programs have gained since 2011. As with the 2011 version,
technical content is informed by applicable guidance, science, practice, and input from subject matter
experts. Examples of revisions include the addition of public health mission-ready packaging and the
importance of identifying jurisdictional public health agency lead or support roles based on incident
characteristics. Other revisions include updates to public health informatics, vaccine administration,
coordination of infectious disease response, chemical laboratory requirements, environmental health,
disaster epidemiology, and additional considerations for protecting the safety of emergency responders
and volunteers. Unlike the 2011 version, this 2018 update does not include programmatic performance
measures. However, jurisdictional public health agencies are encouraged to use the updated content to
foster their own evaluation strategies.
The original capability structure remains in place, and capability titles are consistent with 2011 except for
Capability 8. Previously recognized as Medical Countermeasure Dispensing, the new title, Capability 8:
Medical Countermeasure Dispensing and Administration, better recognizes that pharmaceutical
countermeasures, such as vaccines, antidotes, and antitoxins, can also be “administered” rather than
“dispensed” like pills.
Overarching changes include
• Revising, resequencing, and merging some capability functions
• Defining capability tasks
• Changing “planning” resource elements to “preparedness” resource elements
• Revising all preparedness, skills and training, and equipment and technology resource elements
• Moving all suggested resources (hyperlinks to resource documents) to the CDC website, the CDC
Online Technical Resource and Assistance Center (On-TRAC), and other publicly available websites
Capability Structure
Domains and Tiers
The capability standards are organized into six domains and two tiers. Tier 1 capability standards form
the foundation for public health emergency preparedness and response. Tier 2 capability standards are
more cross-cutting, and their development relies upon having Tier 1 capability standards established
in collaboration with external partners and stakeholders. Although jurisdictional public health agencies
should consider prioritizing development of Tier 1 capabilities, jurisdictional risk assessment findings and
other community factors also may influence jurisdictional prioritization of some Tier 2 capabilities. For
example, based on risk assessment findings and depending on the public health agency’s ESF #8 role,
a jurisdiction also may need to prioritize development of volunteer management strategies to ensure
staffing support for medical countermeasure dispensing and administration activities.
5
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Introduction
Domain Capability and Tier
Community Resilience
Community Preparedness (Tier 1)
Community Recovery (Tier 2)
Incident Management Emergency Operations Coordination (Tier 1)
Information Management
Emergency Public Information and Warning (Tier 1)
Information Sharing (Tier 1)
Countermeasures and Mitigation
Medical Countermeasure Dispensing and Administration (Tier 1)
Medical Materiel Management and Distribution (Tier 1)
Nonpharmaceutical Interventions (Tier 2)
Responder Safety and Health (Tier 1)
Surge Management
Fatality Management (Tier 2)
Mass Care (Tier 2)
Medical Surge (Tier 2)
Volunteer Management (Tier 2)
Biosurveillance
Public Health Laboratory Testing (Tier 1)
Public Health Surveillance and Epidemiological Investigation (Tier 1)
6
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Introduction
Composition
Each capability standard comprises capability functions, and each capability function contains specific
capability tasks that are supported by multiple capability resource elements.
• Capability Title and Definition—Description of the capability as it applies to state, local, tribal, and
territorial public health agencies. Each definition includes a list of potential partners and stakeholders
with which jurisdictions may consider working to achieve the capability
• Capability Functions—Critical segments of the capability that must occur to achieve the capability
definition
• Capability Tasks—Action steps aligned to one or more capability functions. Capability tasks must be
accomplished to complete a capability function
• Capability Resource Elements—Resources a jurisdiction should have or have access to in order
to successfully perform capability tasks associated with capability functions. Resource elements are
listed sequentially to align with corresponding tasks in each function. While not necessarily listed first,
“priority” resource elements are potentially the most critical for completing capability tasks based on
jurisdictional risk assessments and other forms of community input. The three categories of capability
resource elements are
· Preparedness (P)—Components to consider within existing operational plans, standard operating
procedures, guidelines, documents, or other types of written agreements, such as contracts or
memoranda of understanding (MOUs)
· Skills and Training (S/T)—General baseline descriptions, competencies, and skills that personnel
and teams should possess in order to achieve a capability
· Equipment and Technology (E/T)—Infrastructure a jurisdiction should have or have access to with
sufficient quantities or levels of effectiveness to achieve the intent of any related capability task
Title and Definition
Functions
Tasks Resource Elements
Capability Structure: Composition
7
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Using the Capability Standards for
Strategic Planning
State, local, tribal, and territorial
public health agencies exist
within a landscape of diverse
governance, organizational structures,
legal authorities, partnerships,
stakeholders, risks, demographics,
and resources that influence
jurisdiction-to-jurisdiction public
health emergency preparedness
priorities. The 2018 Public Health
Emergency Preparedness and
Response Capabilities: National
Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and
Territorial Public Health describes
the components necessary to
advance jurisdictional public health
preparedness and response capacity.
The capability standards serve as a state, local, tribal, and territorial resource to assess, build, and
sustain jurisdictional public health agency preparedness and response capacity by further defining the
jurisdictional public health agency ESF #8 role while guiding program improvement initiatives to address
preparedness and response planning gaps. Additionally, state, local, tribal, and territorial public health
agencies must remain aware of new and emerging public health threats. From Capability 1: Community
Preparedness to Capability 15: Volunteer Management, jurisdictional public health agencies must be
adaptable when responding to public health threats and emergencies within the context of their
communities and in alignment with incident characteristics.
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities
Planning Model
The following Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Planning Model updates the planning
roadmap described in the 2011 Public Health Preparedness Capabilities: National Standards for State and
Local Planning. It outlines a process jurisdictional public health agencies can follow to identify public
health emergency preparedness and response program development priorities. Consistent with the U.S.
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Preparedness Cycle, the following diagram illustrates a three-
phase approach to identify priorities and implement jurisdictional emergency preparedness planning and
response initiatives.
8
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Using the Capability Standards for Strategic Planning
1. Assess Current State
Public Health Emergency Preparedness
and Response Capabilities Planning Model
1. Assess Current State 3. Develop Plans2. Determine Strategies
and Activities
Step 1a
Assess Organizational
Roles and Responsibilities
Step 3a
Plan Organizational
Initiatives
Step 2a
Identify and Review
Jurisdictional Inputs
Step 1b
Assess
Resource Elements
Step 3b
Plan Capacity Building
and Sustain Activities
Step 2b
Prioritize Domains
and Capabilities
Step 1c
Assess
Performance
Step 3c
Plan Capacity Evaluations
and Demonstrations
Step 2c
Develop Short-term and
Long-term Goals
Phase 1: Assess Current State
Step 1a: Assess Organizational Roles and Responsibilities
The first step in the assessment phase is to determine which organizational entities within the jurisdiction
are responsible for each domain, capability standard, and applicable capability resource elements.
Organizational entities may include allied state agencies, such as emergency management, partner
organizations, other jurisdictional public health agencies, health care coalitions, community-based
partners, and other jurisdictional stakeholders.
Step 1b: Assess Resource Elements
Each capability function includes a list of capability resource elements from three categories: preparedness,
skills and training, and equipment and technology. To assess current capability, jurisdictions should
review all resource elements (with emphasis on priority resource elements) and determine the extent
of their availability within the jurisdiction. Public health agencies are not expected to be independently
responsible for all capability resource elements, as the ability to achieve the capability standards relies
heavily on partnerships.
Successfully attaining capability resource elements is defined as the ability to demonstrate that a
jurisdictional public health agency either has (on hand or within existing plans and documents) or has
access to (partner agency or organization has the jurisdictional authority or responsibility for the resource
and evidence exists that agreements regarding roles and responsibilities are in place) the resource element.
Strategies that address challenges and barriers for fully attaining capability resource elements should help
inform jurisdictional planning, training, and exercise initiatives.
9
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Using the Capability Standards for Strategic Planning
Step 1c: Assess Performance
The ability to achieve capability functions should be reviewed through jurisdictional demonstrations
of performance and other types of evaluation. Examples of performance demonstrations may include
using CDC-defined performance measures, measuring jurisdictional effectiveness when delivering
“everyday” core public health agency mandates, as relevant, implementing jurisdictional training and
exercise programs, and implementing formal after-action processes, including developing and completing
corrective action plans.
Phase 2: Determine Strategies and Activities
Step 2a: Identify and Review Jurisdictional Inputs
In addition to assessing and reviewing capability resource elements, jurisdictions should review
supplementary information sources to help identify jurisdictional needs and gaps. Supplementary
information sources may include
• Existing data from jurisdictional hazard vulnerability analyses (jurisdictional risk assessment findings)
• Jurisdictional intelligence data, such as fusion center data or information obtained from intelligence
reports or briefings
• Jurisdictional emergency management response plans, such as scenario-based plans
• Funding considerations, such as guidance or funding requirements from related federal preparedness
programs
• Current public health strategic plans or strategic priorities
• Previous state and local accreditation or recognition efforts, such as Project Public Health Ready and
Public Health Accreditation Board standards
• Jurisdictional results or action plans resulting from CDC operational readiness reviews
• After-action reports and corrective action plans
Step 2b: Prioritize Domains and Capabilities
The definitions described within the capability standards are broad. Jurisdictional public health agencies
are not expected to simultaneously and completely address all identified issues, gaps, and needs across all
capabilities in the short term. Instead, jurisdictions should periodically reprioritize the capability standards
they pursue based on regularly updated jurisdictional inputs, including risk assessment findings.
Equally important, resource elements described within each capability function are not representative
of all potential resource types or the quantities that may be required. Therefore, identifying the need for
additional prioritization criteria when assessing individual capability resource elements is critical for public
health agencies because resources that are not specifically stated in the capability standards may be
necessary to achieve capability tasks.
Step 2c: Develop Short-term and Long-term Goals
For the purposes of this planning model, short-term goals are defined as one-year goals, and long-term
goals are defined as two- to five-year goals. Jurisdictional public health agencies should review the various
inputs described in step 2a, analyze their priorities based on the prioritization criteria described in step 2b,
and determine a set of short-term and long-term capability development goals.
10
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Using the Capability Standards for Strategic Planning
Goals for capability development should align with capability definitions, capability functions, capability
tasks, and capability resource elements. For example, short-term goals may include building a particular
set of tasks within a capability function by ensuring the presence of all priority resource elements, while
a long-term goal would be to demonstrate performance and ultimately sustain all capability functions.
Phase 3: Develop Plans
Step 3a: Plan Organizational Initiatives
Jurisdictional public health agencies should establish concrete organizational initiatives and plan activities
to achieve short- and long-term goals. For the purposes of this planning model, an assumption is made
that activities specifically relate to individual capability domains, capability definitions, capability functions,
capability tasks, and capability resource elements. However, in practice, jurisdictional public health
agencies may group related activities to address multiple capability standards within any single project or
program development initiative.
Step 3b: Plan Capacity Building and Sustain Activities
Generally, jurisdictional public health agencies build, sustain, or potentially scale back organizational
initiatives based on the most recent assessment of needs, gaps, priorities, and goals. For build-and-sustain
scenarios, jurisdictional public health agencies should pursue formal and informal partnerships where
necessary based on the projected type(s) of support required. Guidance provided to local jurisdictional
public health agencies should ideally describe development priorities for capability standards and
capability functions. For scale-back scenarios, jurisdictional public health agencies should clearly identify
specific conditions, such as strategic, budgetary, and risk assessments that influence the need to scale
back efforts.
Jurisdictional public health agencies also should identify and prioritize technical assistance needed, from
CDC or other sources, when developing the capability standards. Technical assistance needs may relate
to the development of specific capability functions and capability resource elements, such as developing
or modifying plans or processes, training personnel, or building or investing in new equipment and
technology.
Step 3c: Plan Capacity Evaluations and Demonstrations
Demonstrating and evaluating strategies and activities are generally a later step in the capability
development process. Jurisdictional public health agencies can demonstrate the capability standards by
participating in various levels of exercises, planned events, and real incidents. CDC strongly encourages
jurisdictional public health agencies to leverage routine public health activities, as applicable, to exercise
and evaluate the capability standards. Exercises, events, or incidents should be documented and after-
action reports and corrective action plans should be developed and implemented.
11
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
At-A-Glance: Capability Definitions, Functions,
and Summary of Changes
Capability 1: Community Preparedness
Definition: Community preparedness is the ability of communities to prepare for, withstand, and recover
from public health incidents in both the short and long term. Through engagement and coordination
with a cross-section of state, local, tribal, and territorial partners and stakeholders, the public health role in
community preparedness is to
• Support the development of public health, health care, human services, mental/behavioral health,
and environmental health systems that support community preparedness
• Participate in awareness training on how to prevent, respond to, and recover from incidents that
adversely affect public health
• Identify at-risk individuals with access and functional needs that may be disproportionately impacted
by an incident or event
• Promote awareness of and access to public health, health care, human services, mental/behavioral
health, and environmental health resources that help protect the community’s health and address the
access and functional needs of at-risk individuals
• Engage in preparedness activities that address the access and functional needs of the whole
community as well as cultural, socioeconomic, and demographic factors
• Convene or participate with community partners to identify and implement additional ways to
strengthen community resilience
• Plan to address the health needs of populations that have been displaced because of incidents that
have occurred in their own or distant communities, such as after a radiological or nuclear incident or
natural disaster
Functions: This capability consists of the ability to perform the functions listed below.
• Function 1: Determine risks to the health of the jurisdiction
• Function 2: Strengthen community partnerships to support public health preparedness
• Function 3: Coordinate with partners and share information through community social networks
• Function 4: Coordinate training and provide guidance to support community involvement with
preparedness efforts
Summary of Changes: The updates align content with new national standards, updated science, and
current public health priorities and strategies. Listed below are specific changes made to this capability.
• Defines at-risk individuals as people with access and functional needs that may be disproportionately
impacted by an incident or event, and provides parameters to identify those populations
• Highlights Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements in jurisdictional public health
preparedness and response plans
• Accentuates the importance of community partnerships, including tribes and native-serving organizations
in public health preparedness and response activities
• Promotes integration of community partners to support restoration of community networks and social
connectedness to improve community resilience
12
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
At-A-Glance: Capability Definitions, Functions, and Summary of Changes
Capability 2: Community Recovery
Definition: Community recovery is the ability of communities to identify critical assets, facilities, and other
services within public health, emergency management, health care, human services, mental/behavioral
health, and environmental health sectors that can guide and prioritize recovery operations. Communities
should consider collaborating with jurisdictional partners and stakeholders to plan, advocate, facilitate,
monitor, and implement the restoration of public health, health care, human services, mental/behavioral
health, and environmental health sectors to at least a day-to-day level of functioning comparable to
pre-incident levels and to improved levels, where possible.
Functions: This capability consists of the ability to perform the functions listed below.
• Function 1: Identify and monitor community recovery needs
• Function 2: Support recovery operations for public health and related systems for the community
• Function 3: Implement corrective actions to mitigate damage from future incidents
Summary of Changes: The updates align content with new national standards, updated science, and
current public health priorities and strategies. Listed below are specific changes made to this capability.
• Highlights the need to define the jurisdictional public health agency recovery lead and support role
• Supports the National Disaster Recovery Framework (NDRF)
• Promotes integration of community partners to support community recovery and restoration
• Emphasizes engagement of community partners to access hard-to-reach populations to ensure
inclusive communications that meet the needs of the whole community
Capability 3: Emergency Operations Coordination
Definition: Emergency operations coordination is the ability to coordinate with emergency management
and to direct and support an incident or event with public health or health care implications by
establishing a standardized, scalable system of oversight, organization, and supervision that is consistent
with jurisdictional standards and practices and the National Incident Management System (NIMS).
Functions: This capability consists of the ability to perform the functions listed below.
• Function 1: Conduct preliminary assessment to determine the need for activation of public health
emergency operations
• Function 2: Activate public health emergency operations
• Function 3: Develop and maintain an incident response strategy
• Function 4: Manage and sustain the public health response
• Function 5: Demobilize and evaluate public health emergency operations
Summary of Changes: The updates align content with new national standards, updated science, and
current public health priorities and strategies. Listed below are specific changes made to this capability.
• Distinguishes the need to identify and clarify the jurisdictional ESF #8 response role based on incident
type and characteristics
• Incorporates the National Health Security Strategy and Crisis Standards of Care for public health
activation
• Emphasizes the importance of supporting development of mission-ready packages (MRPs) for mutual
aid and understanding the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC)
13
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
At-A-Glance: Capability Definitions, Functions, and Summary of Changes
Capability 4: Emergency Public Information and Warning
Definition: Emergency public information and warning is the ability to develop, coordinate, and
disseminate information, alerts, warnings, and notifications to the public and incident management
personnel.
Functions: This capability consists of the ability to perform the functions listed below.
• Function 1: Activate the emergency public information system
• Function 2: Determine the need for a Joint Information System
• Function 3: Establish and participate in information system operations
• Function 4: Establish avenues for public interaction and information exchange
• Function 5: Issue public information, alerts, warnings, and notifications
Summary of Changes: The updates align content with new national standards, updated science, and
current public health priorities and strategies. Listed below are specific changes made to this capability.
• Promotes the need to leverage social media platforms for issuing emergency public information
and warnings
• Clarifies conditions for establishing a virtual Joint Information Center and Joint Information System
• Includes content to identify and reach populations at risk to be disproportionately impacted by
incidents and those with limited access to public information messages
Capability 5: Fatality Management
Definition: Fatality management is the ability to coordinate with partner organizations and agencies to
provide fatality management services. The public health agency role in fatality management activities may
include supporting
• Recovery and preservation of remains
• Identification of the deceased
• Determination of cause and manner of death
• Release of remains to an authorized individual
• Provision of mental/behavioral health assistance for the grieving
The role also may include supporting activities for the identification, collection, documentation, retrieval,
and transportation of human remains, personal effects, and evidence to the examination location or
incident morgue.
Functions: This capability consists of the ability to perform the functions listed below.
• Function 1: Determine the public health agency role in fatality management
• Function 2: Identify and facilitate access to public health resources to support fatality management
operations
• Function 3: Assist in the collection and dissemination of antemortem data
• Function 4: Support the provision of survivor mental/behavioral health services
• Function 5: Support fatality processing and storage operations
14
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
At-A-Glance: Capability Definitions, Functions, and Summary of Changes
Summary of Changes: The updates align content with new national standards, updated science, and
current public health priorities and strategies. Listed below are specific changes made to this capability.
• Clarifies importance of identifying the public health agency role in fatality management and describes
potential fatality management lead, advisory, and support roles
• Aligns the fatality management definition to the existing federal definition as recommended by the
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Disaster Mortuary Operational Response Team
(DMORT)
• Updates resources to improve coordination, accuracy, and timeliness of electronic mortality reporting
Capability 6: Information Sharing
Definition: Information sharing is the ability to conduct multijurisdictional and multidisciplinary exchange
of health-related information and situational awareness data among federal, state, local, tribal, and
territorial levels of government and the private sector. This capability includes the routine sharing of
information as well as issuing of public health alerts to all levels of government and the private sector in
preparation for and in response to events or incidents of public health significance.
Functions: This capability consists of the ability to perform the functions listed below.
• Function 1: Identify stakeholders that should be incorporated into information flow and define
information sharing needs
• Function 2: Identify and develop guidance, standards, and systems for information exchange
• Function 3: Exchange information to determine a common operating picture
Summary of Changes: The updates align content with new national standards, updated science, and
current public health priorities and strategies. Listed below are specific changes made to this capability.
• Increases alignment to public health surveillance and data strategies
• Emphasizes the need to implement data security and cybersecurity
• Emphasizes the need to decrease reporting time and increase collaboration by expanding use of
electronic information systems, such as electronic death registration (EDR), electronic laboratory
reporting (ELR), and syndromic surveillance systems
Capability 7: Mass Care
Definition: Mass care is the ability of public health agencies to coordinate with and support partner
agencies to address, within a congregate location (excluding shelter-in-place locations), the public health,
health care, mental/behavioral health, and human services needs of those impacted by an incident. This
capability includes coordinating ongoing surveillance and public health assessments to ensure that health
needs continue to be met as the incident evolves.
Functions: This capability consists of the ability to perform the functions listed below.
• Function 1: Determine public health role in mass care operations
• Function 2: Determine mass care health needs of the impacted population
• Function 3: Coordinate public health, health care, and mental/behavioral health services
• Function 4: Monitor mass care population health
15
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
At-A-Glance: Capability Definitions, Functions, and Summary of Changes
Summary of Changes: The updates align content with new national standards, updated science, and
current public health priorities and strategies. Listed below are specific changes made to this capability.
• Incorporates content for accommodating individuals with access and functional needs within general
population shelters
• Includes considerations for registration of individuals requiring decontamination or medical tracking in
the event of an environmental health incident
• Coordinated content with the HHS Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response’s (ASPR) Health
Care Preparedness and Response Capabilities
Capability 8: Medical Countermeasure Dispensing and Administration
Definition: Medical countermeasure dispensing and administration is the ability to provide medical
countermeasures to targeted population(s) to prevent, mitigate, or treat the adverse health effects of a
public health incident, according to public health guidelines. This capability focuses on dispensing and
administering medical countermeasures, such as vaccines, antiviral drugs, antibiotics, and antitoxins.
Functions: This capability consists of the ability to perform the functions listed below.
• Function 1: Determine medical countermeasure dispensing/administration strategies
• Function 2: Receive medical countermeasures to be dispensed/administered
• Function 3: Activate medical countermeasure dispensing/administration operations
• Function 4: Dispense/administer medical countermeasures to targeted population(s)
• Function 5: Report adverse events
Summary of Changes: The updates align content with new national standards, updated science, and
current public health priorities and strategies. Listed below are specific changes made to this capability.
• Revises the Capability 8 title, definition, and content to account for both the dispensing and the
administration of medical countermeasures, such as vaccines, antidotes, and antitoxins
• Adds content and resources to account for potential radiological or nuclear exposure
• Broadens the network of dispensing and administration sites to include pharmacies and other locations
Capability 9: Medical Materiel Management and Distribution
Definition: Medical materiel management and distribution is the ability to acquire, manage, transport,
and track medical materiel during a public health incident or event and the ability to recover and account
for unused medical materiel, such as pharmaceuticals, vaccines, gloves, masks, ventilators, or medical
equipment after an incident.
Functions: This capability consists of the ability to perform the functions listed below.
• Function 1: Direct and activate medical materiel management and distribution
• Function 2: Acquire medical materiel from national stockpiles or other supply sources
• Function 3: Distribute medical materiel
• Function 4: Monitor medical materiel inventories and medical materiel distribution operations
• Function 5: Recover medical materiel and demobilize distribution operations
16
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
At-A-Glance: Capability Definitions, Functions, and Summary of Changes
Summary of Changes: The updates align content with new national standards, updated science, and
current public health priorities and strategies. Listed below are specific changes made to this capability.
• Broadens the cold chain management guidance to include all aspects of storage and handling
• Expands recovery activities to incorporate proper handling and disposal of infectious, hazardous, or
contaminated materiel and waste
• Accounts for security and inventory management tasks that occur throughout the entire distribution
process
Capability 10: Medical Surge
Definition: Medical surge is the ability to provide adequate medical evaluation and care during events
that exceed the limits of the normal medical infrastructure of an affected community. It encompasses
the ability of the health care system to endure a hazard impact, maintain or rapidly recover operations
that were compromised, and support the delivery of medical care and associated public health services,
including disease surveillance, epidemiological inquiry, laboratory diagnostic services, and environmental
health assessments.
Functions: This capability consists of the ability to perform the functions listed below.
• Function 1: Assess the nature and scope of the incident
• Function 2: Support activation of medical surge
• Function 3: Support jurisdictional medical surge operations
• Function 4: Support demobilization of medical surge operations
Summary of Changes: The updates align content with new national standards, updated science, and
current public health priorities and strategies. Listed below are specific changes made to this capability.
• Emphasizes the need to define public health agency lead and support roles within medical surge
operations
• Eliminates use of the term “HAvBED” because the term is no longer promoted by the Hospital
Preparedness Program (HPP) and focuses instead on “situational awareness” and “health care systems
tracking” as an overarching theme
• Emphasizes the need to identify and clarify the jurisdictional ESF #8 response role in medical surge
operations based on jurisdictional role and incident characteristics
Capability 11: Nonpharmaceutical Interventions
Definition: Nonpharmaceutical interventions are actions that people and communities can take
to help slow the spread of illness or reduce the adverse impact of public health emergencies. This
capability focuses on communities, community partners, and stakeholders recommending and
implementing nonpharmaceutical interventions in response to the needs of an incident, event, or threat.
Nonpharmaceutical interventions may include
• Isolation
• Quarantine
• Restrictions on movement and travel advisories or warnings
• Social distancing
• External decontamination
• Hygiene
• Precautionary protective behaviors
17
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
At-A-Glance: Capability Definitions, Functions, and Summary of Changes
Functions: This capability consists of the ability to perform the functions listed below.
• Function 1: Engage partners and identify factors that impact nonpharmaceutical interventions
• Function 2: Determine nonpharmaceutical interventions
• Function 3: Implement nonpharmaceutical interventions
• Function 4: Monitor nonpharmaceutical interventions
Summary of Changes: The updates align content with new national standards, updated science, and
current public health priorities and strategies. Listed below are specific changes made to this capability.
• Focuses on collaboration by expanding suggested partners for implementing nonpharmaceutical
interventions
• Supports establishment of community reception center processes to enhance ability to respond to
radiological and nuclear threats
• Highlights management of mass gatherings (delay and cancel) based on all-hazards scenarios
Capability 12: Public Health Laboratory Testing
Definition: Public health laboratory testing is the ability to implement and perform methods to detect,
characterize, and confirm public health threats. It also includes the ability to report timely data, provide
investigative support, and use partnerships to address actual or potential exposure to threat agents in
multiple matrices, including clinical specimens and food, water, and other environmental samples. This
capability supports passive and active surveillance when preparing for, responding to, and recovering from
biological, chemical, and radiological (if a Radiological Laboratory Response Network is established) public
health threats and emergencies.
Functions: This capability consists of the ability to perform the functions listed below.
• Function 1: Conduct laboratory testing and report results
• Function 2: Enhance laboratory communications and coordination
• Function 3: Support training and outreach
Summary of Changes: The updates align content with new national standards, updated science, and
current public health priorities and strategies. Listed below are specific changes made to this capability.
• Updates Laboratory Response Network (LRN) requirements
• Incorporates LRN-chemical requirements
• Prioritizes cooperation, coordination, and information sharing with LRN laboratories, other public
laboratories, and jurisdictional sentinel laboratories
Capability 13: Public Health Surveillance and Epidemiological Investigation
Definition: Public health surveillance and epidemiological investigation is the ability to create, maintain,
support, and strengthen routine surveillance and detection systems and epidemiological investigation
processes. It also includes the ability to expand these systems and processes in response to incidents of
public health significance.
Functions: This capability consists of the ability to perform the functions listed below.
• Function 1: Conduct or support public health surveillance
• Function 2: Conduct public health and epidemiological investigations
18
Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Capabilities:
National Standards for State, Local, Tribal, and Territorial Public Health
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
At-A-Glance: Capability Definitions, Functions, and Summary of Changes
• Function 3: Recommend, monitor, and analyze mitigation actions
• Function 4: Improve public health surveillance and epidemiological investigation systems
Summary of Changes: The updates align content with new national standards, updated science, and
current public health priorities and strategies. Listed below are specific changes made to this capability.
• Increases alignment to public health surveillance and data strategies
• Strengthens surveillance systems for persons in isolation or quarantine and persons placed under
monitoring and movement protocols
• Emphasizes syndromic surveillance and data collection to improve situational awareness and
responsiveness to hazardous events and disease outbreaks, for example, participation in CDC’s National
Syndromic Surveillance Program BioSense Platform
Capability 14: Responder Safety and Health
Definition: Responder safety and health is the ability to protect public health and other emergency
responders during pre-deployment, deployment, and post-deployment.
Functions: This capability consists of the ability to perform the functions listed below.
• Function 1: Identify responder safety and health risks
• Function 2: Identify and support risk-specific responder safety and health training
• Function 3: Monitor responder safety and health during and after incident response
Summary of Changes: The updates align content with new national standards, updated science, and
current public health priorities and strategies. Listed below are specific changes made to this capability.
• Incorporates the need to securely manage responder data
• Improves responder on-site management, tracking, in-processing, and out-processing
• Reprioritizes hierarchy of control and promotes the alignment of responder safety and health control
measures, for example, personal protective equipment (PPE), with jurisdictional risk assessment findings
Capability 15: Volunteer Management
Definition: Volunteer management is the ability to coordinate with emergency management and partner
agencies to identify, recruit, register, verify, train, and engage volunteers to support the jurisdictional public
health agency’s preparedness, response, and recovery activities during pre-deployment, deployment, and
post-deployment.
Functions: This capability consists of the ability to perform the functions listed below.
• Function 1: Recruit, coordinate, and train volunteers
• Function 2: Notify, organize, assemble, and deploy volunteers
• Function 3: Conduct or support volunteer safety and health monitoring and surveillance
• Function 4: Demobilize volunteers
Summary of Changes: The updates align content with new national standards, updated science, and
current public health priorities and strategies. Listed below are specific changes made to this capability.
• Addresses the need to monitor volunteer safety, risks, and actions during and after an incident
• Strengthens and clarifies volunteer eligibility considerations, such as medical, physical, and emotional
health, during the volunteer selection process
• Promotes use of Emergency Responder Health Monitoring and Surveillance™ (ERHMS™)
Answered Same DayMay 13, 2021

Solution

Jose Francis answered on May 14 2021
27 Votes

The University of Queensland
Running Head : Management
1
Management
Christian
Student Code ‘
Instructor Code
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