1Assessment Brief Assessment Brief_Level_Module ASC_5_493_22/23 Read this assessment brief carefully, it tells you how you are going to be assessed, how to submit your...

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Make a lab report on H&E and special staining. Please follow all the instructions mentioned in the assignment.


1 Assessment Brief Assessment Brief_Level_Module ASC_5_493_22/23 Read this assessment brief carefully, it tells you how you are going to be assessed, how to submit your assessment on-time and how (and when) you’ll receive your marks and feedback. Module Code ASC_5_493_22/23 Module Title Cellular Pathology and Imaging Lecturer Nymeth Ali/Hodan Jama % of Module Mark 50% Distributed 9/11/2021 Submission Method Submit online via this Module’s Moodle site Submission Deadline 14/12/2022 23:59pm Release of Feedback Feedback will be available online from 22/12/2021 Release of Marks Provisional marks will be available in the Gradebook on Moodle from 28/12/2022 Assessment: During the practical session, students will have to complete a microscopic assessment to identify the tissue type and identify the organ. The images will be displayed on Microsoft PowerPoint and the activity will take 10 minutes. The assessment sheet will be collated at the end of the 10 minutes and the provisional mark will be available on the 28/12/2022. Case review of a patient with a particular clinical scenario. Students will have to complete a lab report, circa 2000 words. Students will have to identify the cellular pathology techniques that have been used to diagnose the disease considering the patient information provided and the techniques available to diagnose the condition. Students will have to provide the information about the condition discussed. The third element of the lab report will include a reflection regarding the 4 laboratory practical sessions, to include skills developed and how will this be applied as a Biomedical Scientist in a diagnostic setting (circa 500 words). 2 Assessment Details: Type: Report and in class practical assessment Resources: Background reading and resources Word Count: As a guide, aim for 2500 words. The maximum word limit is 2750 words. Footnotes will not count towards word count totals but must only be used for referencing, not for the provision of additional text. The bibliography will not count towards the word total. If the total word limit is exceeded, a 5% penalty for every 50 words over will be applied to the overall mark. Presentation: ▪ Work must be referenced, and a bibliography provided ▪ Work must be submitted as a Word document (.doc/docx) ▪ Course work must be submitted using Arial font size 11 (or larger if you need to), with a minimum of 1.5 line spacing ▪ Your student number must appear at the front of the coursework. Your name must not be on your coursework. Referencing: Harvard Referencing should be used, see your Library Subject Guide for guides and tips on referencing. Regulations: Make sure you understand the University Regulations on expected academic practice and academic misconduct. Note in particular: ▪ Your work must be your own. Markers will be attentive to both the plausibility of the sources provided as well as the consistency and approach to writing of the work. Simply, if you do the research and reading, and then write it up on your own, giving the reference to sources, you will approach the work in the appropriate way and will cause not give markers reason to question the authenticity of the work. ▪ All quotations must be credited and properly referenced. Paraphrasing is still regarded as plagiarism if you fail to acknowledge the source for the ideas being expressed. https://libguides.lsbu.ac.uk/subjects/home http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/84347/academic-regulations.pdf http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/84347/academic-regulations.pdf 3 TURNITIN: When you upload your work to the Moodle site it will be checked by anti-plagiarism software. Learning Outcomes This assessment will fully or partially assess the following learning outcomes for this module. 1. Demonstrate the understanding of the principles and application of visualisation and imaging techniques, including microscopy, to aid diagnosis and treatment selection. (Knowledge and Understanding) 2. Demonstrate knowledge of the gross structure and ultrastructure of normal cells and tissues and the structural changes which may occur during diseases (Knowledge and understanding). 3. Recognise and apply physics principles in imaging. (Intellectual Skills) 4. Prepare cells and tissues for microscopic examination. Obtain, record, collate, and analyse biomedical imaging using appropriate techniques. Apply immunological techniques used in clinical and research laboratories; (Practical Skills) 5. Identify and interpret pathological changes in tissues through group discussion and teamwork (Transferable skills). Assessment Criteria and Weighting LSBU marking criteria have been developed to help tutors give you clear and helpful feedback on your work. They will be applied to your work to help you understand what you have accomplished, how any mark given was arrived at, and how you can improve your work in future. 4 Criteria Feedforward comments 100-80% 79-70% 69-60% 59-50% 49-40% 39-30% 29-0% 1 5 % 1. Research Systematic identification and use of academic and relevant resources Extensive independent relevant research evidenced by quality and quantity used. Ability to draw on own research and that of others. Extensive independent relevant research evidenced by quality and quantity used. Some autonomous research. Wide range of relevant sources identified and used. Very little guidance needed. A range of sources identified and used. Limited guidance needed. Limited research identified and used. Some guidance needed to complete research tasks. Some evidence of research but insufficient amount. Needs support to develop research skills. Little or no research presented. Needs significant support to develop research skills. 2 0 % 2. Subject Knowledge Understanding and application of subject knowledge. Contribution to subject debate. Shows sustained breadth, accuracy and detail in understanding key aspects of subject. Contributes to subject debate. Awareness of ambiguities and limitations of knowledge. Shows breadth, accuracy and detail in understanding key aspects of subject. Contributes to subject debate. Some awareness of ambiguities and limitations of knowledge. Accurate and extensive understanding of key aspects of subject. Evidence of coherent knowledge. Accurate understanding of key aspects of subject. Evidence of coherent knowledge. Understanding of key aspects of subject. Some evidence of coherent knowledge. Some evidence of superficial understanding of subject. Inaccuracies. Little or no evidence of understanding of subject. Inaccuracies. 2 0 % 3. Critical Analysis Analysis and interpretation of sources, literature and/or results. Structuring of issues/debates. Very high-quality analysis developed independently. Sustained evaluation and synthesis of resources. Use of evidence-based arguments. Thoroughly identifies trends, inconsistency, congruence, and states the implications. Sustained evaluation and synthesis of resources. Use of evidence-based arguments. Thoroughly identifies trends, inconsistency, congruence, and states the implications. Evaluation and synthesis of resources. Use of evidence- based arguments. Identifies trends, inconsistency, congruence, and states the implications. Evaluation and synthesis of resources. Use of evidence-based arguments. Some attempt at evaluation and synthesis of resources. Some use of evidence- based arguments. Limited evaluation of resources. Limited use of evidence- based arguments Little or no evaluation of resources. Very little use of evidence-based arguments. 2 0 % 6. Practical Competence Skills to apply theory to practice or to test theory Consistently applies comprehensive practical and/or technical skills which reflect the correct application of theory to context. Applies comprehensive practical and/or technical skills which reflect the correct application of theory to context. Applies practical and/or technical skills very well and with careful application of theory to context. Applies practical and/or technical skills correctly and with some application of theory to context with only minimal errors. Applies a sufficient level of practical and/or technical skills but with some errors. Limited application of theory to context. Applies some aspects of the practical and/or technical skills but these are incomplete or contain important errors. Very limited application of theory to context. Limited application of some aspects of the practical and/or technical skills. No application of theory to context. 5 % 8. Academic Integrity1 Acknowledges and gives credit to the work of others follows the conventions and practices of the discipline including appropriate use of referencing standards for discipline. Consistent, error free application of relevant referencing conventions with great attention to detail. Consistent, error free application of relevant referencing conventions. Consistent application of relevant referencing conventions with few errors. Application of relevant referencing conventions, with some errors and / or inconsistencies. Generally correct application of relevant referencing conventions, with some errors and / or inconsistencies. Limited application of referencing conventions and / or errors. Very limited or no application of referencing conventions, and/or multiple errors. 2 0 % 10. Personal and Professional Development Management of learning through self-direction, planning and reflection Takes full responsibility for own learning and development through continuous cycles of well- articulated purposeful analysis and planning, supported by extensive evidence Takes full responsibility for own learning and development through continuous cycles of well-articulated purposeful analysis and planning, supported by evidence. Reflection and planning are self-directed, continuous, habitual and evidenced clearly. Strengths have been built on; weaknesses have been mitigated. Evidence that a cycle of reflection and planning has been continuous and productive. Actively works to develop strengths and mitigate weaknesses. Evidence that reflection and planning have led to increased disciplinary engagement and commitment. Developing an awareness of strengths and weaknesses. Weak evidence of reflection and planning for learning but not followed through consistently. Incomplete awareness of personal strengths and weaknesses. Insufficient evidence of reflection or planning for learning and no evidence of awareness of personal strengths and weaknesses. 1 The application of this criterion is independent of the process outlined in the Student Academic Misconduct Procedure http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/118327/student-academic-misconduct-procedure.pdf 5 How to get help We will discuss this Assessment Brief in class. However, if you have related questions, please contact me [name and email] as soon as possible. Resources Tutorials and practical resources on Moodle.
Answered 2 days AfterDec 06, 2022

Answer To: 1Assessment Brief Assessment Brief_Level_Module ASC_5_493_22/23 Read this...

Dr Insiyah R. answered on Dec 08 2022
5 Votes
Introduction
Medical imaging creates visible pictures of inside body structures for scientific and medical research, therapy, and a visual view of internal tissue function. This procedure aims to manage and identify disorders. To make it simple to spot irregularities, this method produces a data bank about the standard structure and function of the organs. This procedure uses sonography, magnetic scopes, thermal and isotope imaging, and radiological and organic imagi
ng using electromagnetic energy such as X-rays and gamma rays.
The location and operation of the body are recorded using a variety of various technologies. Those methods are far more constrained than the techniques that result in pictures. Globally, billions of pictures are produced each year for various diagnostic objectives. Almost half of them use ionising and are recommended by international radiation modulates. Medical imaging creates pictures of interior body structures without using intrusive methods. These graphics were created utilising quick processors and arithmetical and logical energy translation to signals. Later, such impulses are transformed into digital pictures. Those signals stand in for the various bodily tissue kinds.
The use of digital photographs is essential regularly. Handling pictures with a computer is referred to as medical imaging processing. This processing entails a wide range of methods and actions, including picture acquisition, archiving, display, and communication. The function of the image is to represent a measure of the characteristics of a viewed object, such as its colour or illumination.
1.
The advantages of digital photos include quick and inexpensive processing, simple transmission and storage, rapid quality evaluation, many copies while maintaining quality, quick and inexpensive reproduction, and flexible manipulation. Digital photos' drawbacks include copyright infringement, the inability to resize while maintaining quality, the necessity for high-capacity memory, and a quicker CPU for modification. Using a computer to edit a digital image is an image processing technique. This method offers many advantages, including flexibility, adaptability, data storage, and communication. The development of several picture scaling algorithms has made it possible to maintain photos effectively. With this method, several sets of rules must be applied concurrently to the pictures. Multiple dimensions can be handled for both 2D and 3D pictures. In the 1960s, the first image-processing methods were developed. These methods were applied in various sectors, including space exploration, medicine, the arts, and TV picture enhancement. With the advent of computers in the 1970s, image processing became more affordable and quick. In the 2000s, image processing improved in speed, cost, and simplicity.
One of the most intricate systems that ever existed is the human visual system. This system enables living things to categorise and comprehend the numerous intricate components of their surrounding environment. The visual system is made up of the eye, which converts light into neural signals, and the associated brain regions interpret those signals and extract crucial information. The anterior part of the skull contains bilateral cylindrical structures that make up the human eye. Both the lengthwise and across the diameter of the eyes measure 2.5 cm. The pupil, a darkened structure in the centre of the eyeball, is present. With this method, light may pass through the eye. A heavier lighting source causes this system to become smaller. As a result, the retina receives less light, which improves the visual process. The pupil widening is regulated by several muscles that surround the eye. The sclera, or supporting tissues, is always present in the eye.
2.
Any procedure employed for fixing and embedding has a significant risk of unfavourable changes to the cell's or its component molecules' structural makeup. Rapid freezing offers a different approach to preparation that partly gets around this issue by doing away with the necessity for fixing and embedding. A specialised microtome that is kept in a cold chamber can be used to cut the frozen tissue directly. However, while the original structures of individual molecules, such as proteins, are maintained mainly, the fine structure of the cell is frequently disturbed by ice crystals. This is true even when frozen sections are created in this manner to avoid some errors.
For studying cells, a variety of light-microscope approaches are available. In a traditional light microscope, fixed and dyed cells may be examined. In contrast, a fluorescence microscope can be used to find particular molecules in cells using...
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