©Aspire2 International – DBN603 Assignment 2– v XXXXXXXXXXPage 1 of 4 New Zealand Diploma in Business (Level 6) Course Title Strategic Management Course DBN603 Version 6 Title Assessment 2: Assignment...

©Aspire2 International – DBN603 Assignment 2– v XXXXXXXXXXPage 1 of 4
New Zealand Diploma in Business (Level 6)
Course Title Strategic Management
Course DBN603 Version 6
Title Assessment 2: Assignment (Case Study Based)
Level 6 Credits 20 Total Marks
[Weighting]
90
[70%]
Student Name
Student ID

Tutor’s Name

Week Due Due Date
`````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````
Sections S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 Ref Total
Total
Marks
XXXXXXXXXX
Marks
Awarded



Assessor’s Overall Feedback








Student’s Signature: _____________________________ XXXXXXXXXXDate: _________________
©Aspire2 International – DBN603 Assignment 2– v XXXXXXXXXXPage 2 of 4
LEARNING OUTCOMES ASSESSED

Learning Outcome Section Mark Allocation

Percentage Allocation
LO2: Develop the business entity’s strategic
objectives for effective performance.
Section 1 15 marks 12%
LO3: Apply knowledge of the principles
and practices of operations for the strategic
objectives of the entity.
Section 2
15 marks 12%
LO4: Apply knowledge of the principles
and practices of management accounting for
the strategic objectives of the entity.
Section 3
15marks 12%
LO5: Apply knowledge of the principles
and practices of sales/marketing for the
strategic objectives of the entity.
Section 4
15 marks 12%
LO6: Apply knowledge of the principles
and practices of HR and risk management
for the strategic objectives of the entity.
Section 5
30 marks 22%
Formatting and Reference List
Total 90 marks 70%

General Instructions:
1. “APA” 6th edition referencing and citation are compulsory.
2. Plagiarism would be dealt with zero tolerance and you would fail the assessment.
3. A soft copy of assignment must be submitted on Turnitin by the due date and a hard copy
must be submitted to the lecturer on the date advised by lecturer.
Be advised that any similarity rate 15% or above will result in zero marks as stipulated
above.
4. Your work should be free of e
ors with respect to grammar, spellings and punctuation.
Please read and sign the declaration below:
I have understood the content and learning outcomes to be assessed
I have been advised of the purpose and the process of the assessment
I consent to assessment results and materials being used by my establishment
I agree to ca
y out the assessment without assistance from anyone else
___________________________________________ XXXXXXXXXX_____/____/____
Student’s Signature XXXXXXXXXXDate
©Aspire2 International – DBN603 Assignment 2– v XXXXXXXXXXPage 3 of 4
Assessment Instructions
Please read the attached article – Managing Business Operations David Ro
and answer
questions posed in this assessment.
Where possible use New Zealand business examples supporting your ideas.
All researched material must be co
ectly referenced.


Section 1: Business Objectives (LO2 – 15 marks)


In the article the author suggests New Zealand business should set better business strategic
objectives to establish more successful and sustained businesses for the future.
1.1 From the case study develop two strategic business objectives that could be used by New
Zealand businesses to enhance their performance and justify why they are required. (5
marks).
1.2 Cite two New Zealand businesses that are publicly expressing similar business objectives
and explain why they have chosen these objectives. (5 marks).
1.3 Cite one other New Zealand business using a different strategic business objective and
explain why they have used it. (5 marks).
[All discussions or evaluations are to be referenced to acceptable literature.]
Section 2: Business Objectives and Operational Management (LO 3 – 15 marks)


2.1 Discuss the role of operational management in setting strategic business objectives. (Use
examples to support your ideas.) (5 marks).

2.2 Analyse the impact of two operational areas on the strategic business objectives expressed
previously on a New Zealand business. (10 marks)
Section 3: Business Objectives and Management Accounting (LO 4 – 15 marks)


3.1 Discuss the importance of Management Accounting in setting strategic business objectives.
(Use examples to support your ideas.) (5 marks).
©Aspire2 International – DBN603 Assignment 2– v XXXXXXXXXXPage 4 of 4
3.2 Analyse the impact of two management accounting processes on the strategic business
objectives expressed previously on a New Zealand business. (10 marks)
Section 4: Business Objectives and Sales and Marketing (LO 5 – 15 marks)


4.1 Discuss the impact Sales and Marketing has on setting strategic business objectives. (Use
examples to support your ideas.) (5 marks).


4.2 Analyse the impact of two Sales and Marketing processes on the strategic business
objectives expressed previously on a New Zealand business. (10 marks)
Section 5: Business Objectives and Human Resources and Risk Management (LO 5 – 30
marks)


Human Resources
5.1 Discuss the impact Human Resource Management has on setting strategic business
objectives. (Use examples to support your ideas.) (5 marks).

5.2 Analyse the impact of two Human Resource Management processes on the strategic
usiness objectives expressed previously on a New Zealand business. (10 marks)

Risk Management
5.3 Discuss the impact Risk Management has on setting strategic business. (Use examples to
support your ideas.) (5 marks).

5.4 Analyse the impact of two Risk Management processes on the strategic business objectives
expressed previously on a New Zealand business. (10 marks)
References (allocated marks are covered in other sections)

Include a list of books, journal articles, web sites, and other sources used in your investigation or
cited in your assignment in alphabetical order.
Ensure that ALL sources used in your assignment are cited. Use APA 6th edition format in your
eferences. Inco
ect and incomplete citations would not be considered and must be redone. It is
ecommended for you to use at least 5 academic sources.

38
Managing business
operations:
how New Zealand
organisations can
get better and bette
y David Ro
39U N I V E R S I T Y O F A U C K L A N D Business Review
V o l u m e 3 N u m b e r XXXXXXXXXX
Many New Zealand businesses can lift their game
appreciably by pursuing improvements in their operations management.
I make a passionate plea for business managers to dig deep into a
goldmine of available opportunities, extending from suppliers to
internal operations to customers.
Based on my experience in consultancy (primarily in the building
products, consumer goods, pharmaceutical and postal communications
sectors) and executive education, as well as scholarship on the
function, I offer a framework that should guide operations
improvement initiatives in New Zealand businesses.
T he operations management “domain”for manufacturers, service providersor distributors spans the traditional
decision areas of facility choice (location,
size and focus), capacity (timing, size and
type), process/technology selection and
degree of vertical integration/outsourcing.
It also includes the “infrastructural”
policy areas encompassing supply chain
management (procurement, inventory and
internal operations planning/control),
quality management and even aspects of
human resources and new product/service
development.
My framework for improving operations
in any organisation involves four aspects.
1 Establishing direction: aligning
operations with business objectives.
2 Eliminating bad practice: moving to
the performance frontier.
3 “Horses for courses”: positioning on
the performance frontier.
4 Innovation and mitigating trade-offs:
shifting the performance frontier.
These facets cover, at least conceptually,
all the activity areas of managers seeking ▼
40
improvement. I believe many New Zealand firms
have room for improvement in most of these
categories.
1. Establishing direction: aligning
operations priorities with business
objectives
Business strategists emphasise the importance
of achieving coherence both within and
etween functional areas in a firm by insisting
that objectives and policies in each area are
aligned with the business strategy as a whole.
This may seem straightforward in theory, but in
eality practices inconsistent with the business
strategy are legion.
Table 1 presents the results of an informal
survey of executive students, giving examples of
misaligned policies and practices, categorised
into various operations decision areas.
What leads to such incongruence? Perhaps
the biggest culprit is the dearth of firms with a
clear vision of where their operations are
headed, based on their business strategy and
eadily articulated by staff at all levels1. Some
may express incredulity toward various aspects
of strategy – e.g., St Dilbert’s quip defining a
mission statement as “a long, awkward
sentence that demonstrates management’s
inability to think clearly” (Adams, 1996).
However, there is little excuse when managers
create policies and staff act in ways that pull in
diverse directions.
Within a given industry (even a commodity
industry), business objectives should diffe
TABLE 1
Facilities
• Operating a “seconds” shop when quality is a
high priority
• Locating away from major clients when delivery is
paramount
Process choice
• Choosing products that add considerable
complexity to processes when cost is important
Vendor relations
• Sourcing low-quality products when quality is
important
• Not certifying suppliers on quality and time when
these were the organisation’s objectives
Inventory/logistics
• Insufficient stock when delivery/customer service
is important
• High inventory when low cost is a prime objective
Production/operations planning and control
• No operations planning (just financial planning)
• Opting for mass production when staff
skills/competencies are in flexibility
• Putting everyone on a schedule when flexibility
is desired
• Accepting all orders without exception
• Poor call management (lost calls)
• “Get stuff out the door” policy at end of financial
year (when quality is important)
• Reducing appointment times to increase
throughput when quality is the number one priority
• Making customers wait inordinately long periods
to co
ect mistakes that are the fault of the
organisation (e.g., voids at cashiers)
Quality, customer service and performance
measurement
• Employing fea
intimidation to improve quality
levels
• No quality [time/delivery] measurement at all
(when quality [time/delivery] is important)
• No measurement of staff satisfaction or morale
• Performance measurement tied to each
department rather than to the organisation as a
whole (which encourages “local optimisation”
and discourages flexibility)
Human resources/organisational design
• “Attract highest cali
e staff” a goal, but
ecruitment practices mediocre
• Obsolete (or non-existent) staff training methods
(in particular, for new staff and
Feb 13, 2021DBN603Aspire2 International
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